Brock

During the war, brock was put out regularly to be picked up and fed to the pigs of the near-by farm.

I don’t know or can’t remember Brock’s name or how he acquired the nickname, Brock, though I think it’s short from his surname. He was an alcoholic friend of Jim McMahon, an alcoholic friend of mine who’s since died. Brock had mouth cancer and to get rid of it lost a lot of jaw and couldn’t eat. He only had the one tooth anyway. He didn’t know about pureeing food in a blender. I gave him mine with instructions how to use it. He told me he did.

I was surprised to be told he’d married. There’s no accounting for women but… Brock? She was African and gained nationality by the marriage I suppose.

I saw a spot on his nose that reminded me of the cancerous mark a neighbour had had removed and told him to get it seen to.

He stopped me to tell me he had and it was cancerous but not life-threatening.

The other day he told me he’d had titanium implants done and was about to have teeth installed. “About time too,” I said, “You’ve hung onto that one tooth long enough,” that I’d long since recommended he get rid of. He said he’d no teeth now. I laughed. “Get off!” he said, laughing too, “away with you.”

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About johnbrucecairns

I'm a retired history teacher who's written for most of his life with a book readied for publication.
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8 Responses to Brock

  1. Rudi Fischer says:

    John, enjoyed reading this very much. I was wondering as I read it if it was a part of a book or just a portion of your life. Either way very nice.I just finished a book, historical fiction, about my life. I would like it if you would visit my blog and read the July 10 & August 8 entries. They are excerpts from my book. Please let me know what you think and feel about it. Although that is my life I used a ghost writer to put the words to paper. Thanks

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  2. Fortunately you forgot, making it easier for me to read the entries using the link. Thanks for the comment. My blogs are just portions of my life. Now for yours. Why use a ghost writer?

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    • Rudi Fischer says:

      English is my second language and although I can speak English well and have done many speeches, writing is a little difficult for me. I used a ghost writer for that reason and a secondary reason was the fact that until 3 months ago I did not exsist. To understand that you would have to read the book but I can tell you this much, I am one of those who suffered “sheep dipping” in the service. It is not what it sounds like, it is loosing your identity, everything is gone like you were never born. They make you a new person, untraceable. So now that I know these writings of yours are bits and pieces of your life, I am intrigued and must continue to follow your blog. Did you get a chance to see mine? http://greywolf-force-of-fate.blogspot.com

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      • I did see the extracts of your book, Rudi, but was considered robotic five times so unable to leave a comment for the first one and couldn’t get as far as writing a comment for the second. It reads like fiction. Is it supposed to? How difficult is it for you to write in English? because, if the book is supposed to be historically true, a German-accented English might add to its authenticity as, if autobiographical, a first person past rather than the third person past. And if fiction, that’d give the illusion of truth to fact, which is an aspect of fiction. (All my blogs are from life, as is my story in Dadaosim, An Anthology though it’s being passed off as fantasy. The book coming out, CORRESPONDENCE, also is in the sense I’ve authored it from a correspondence I archived.)

        > Date: Sun, 11 Nov 2012 02:28:48 +0000 > To: johnbrucecairns@hotmail.com >

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      • wolfruediger says:

        Thank you for your input. I like the bid about writing with an accent. Just to put you at ease, I do not speak with an accent. At least that is what people tell me. I took painstaking time to learn the language as it is spoken, not how it is written. As to is the book fiction, those in the know have labeled it fictional history. The chapters all are true, the characters have been changed in name and physical statue because some of the material in the book is still Top Secret. I have had it examined and it passed so that I may publish. Any objectional material as far as the agency is concerned has been removed. When the book was written I was still underground, I was sheep dipped. In the past two years have have slowly gained my identity back. The original book cover showed the author, me, as Brian Bunratty. I happy to report as of 3 months ago that has changed and I can use my real name again. There are two books, with the second one in the works by myself (at the time). The first book is my recruitment and time in the service, Air Force, that is. The second book is my consequent civilian life and my service with the agency.
        I’m looking forward to your book, have to read it.

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      • I didn’t mean literally German-accented, just a little bit of a difference in the writing of it which would allow eg mistakes like ‘loose’ for ‘lose’ without their being wrong in the context of an overall tone which is part and parcel of the style. I don’t think you should’ve bothered too much your English writing might be awkward. The English are careless writers. Americans too. It’s historical fiction then. How would you know the circumstances of a woman’s giving birth unless you were told and in as much detail? There’s no suggestion of that. Knowledge is being assumed by whoever has written the book without any explanation being given. It’s a convention of fiction. It won’t be believed true to fact. > Date: Tue, 13 Nov 2012 15:24:56 +0000 > To: johnbrucecairns@hotmail.com >

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